Wednesday, March 04, 2020

2020 Teak International Air Show Guide is Now Available for Purchase



Every year, from March through November, millions of people hit the road to watch the excitement and thrills as military and civilian flight demonstration teams put their high-performance aircraft through the paces to entertain the crowds and perform at air shows all over the world. Anyone who has attended one of these events will tell you it is thrilling to watch the close quarter flying of the Blue Angels delta formation or the hair-splitting maneuvers of the Thunderbird opposing solos.
While attending the show and enjoying the sights and sounds is an exciting experience that is only half the fun. You can add another whole dimension to that visual experience by monitoring the performing teams’ radio communications.
With a radio scanner in hand, you will experience a whole new perspective of the show that few of the attendees will ever experience – pilot audio from the aircraft cockpit. While everyone else at the air show is just watching and listening to the public address system narrator, you’ll be able to hear what’s happening inside the cockpit, up in the tower and on the ground with the hundreds of players that keep these screaming, state-of-the-art air machines thundering through the skies.
But you can’t tell the players without a program, and to indulge in the craft of monitoring the air show experience you need a current and well-researched list of frequencies that the various performers may use during their performances.
In our new annual Teak Publishing International Air Show Guide eBook, 21st Edition, former Monitoring Times Editor and TSM Milcom columnist Larry Van Horn - N5FPW, delivers the hundreds of air and ground frequencies that you will need to monitor the action when you are within receiving distance of any air show this year.
From the Blue Angels and Thunderbirds, military parachute and search and rescue demonstration teams, to a wide variety of other military and civilian demonstration teams from the U.S. and abroad, Larry has the list of frequencies each unit has used. Now you can bring the excitement you see at the show to your ears. Listening to the nonstop action at the air show on dozens of radio frequencies is part of the real fun of being there.
But wait, there’s more! Larry also has a chapter on tips for enjoying a great day at the air show. You will also get frequency lists for other possible frequencies that may be used at the air show including DoD Intra-Squad Radio frequencies and hosting site aero and LMR frequencies/call signs. We also include in this eBook up-to-date air show frequency listings for overseas military and civilian aeronautical demonstrations teams.
Finally, you will get the latest air show schedules for the U.S. Navy Blue Angels, U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, Canadian Forces Snowbirds, the Army Golden Knight Parachute Teams and more. We include the latest air traffic control frequencies and selected LMR trunk radio systems for each facility hosting or associated with a show when known.
This is the 21st annual edition of this popular frequency monitoring guide published by the author in either Monitoring Times magazine, The Spectrum Monitor e-zine, or by Teak Publishing in eBook form. This edition of the Teak Publishing Air Show Guide is the most comprehensive collection of air show information and frequencies ever published for the radio listening hobbyist.
The 2020 Teak International Air Show Guide is now available for purchase worldwide from Amazon.com at https://www.amazon.com/Teak-International-Air-Show-Guide-ebook/dp/B085FV1LCN/The price for this fourth e-Book the edition is still only US$3.99. Since this book is being released internationally, Amazon customers in the United Kingdom, Germany, France Spain, Italy, Japan, India, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, and Australia can order this e-Book from Amazon websites directly servicing these countries. All other countries can use the regular Amazon.com website.
So when the T-Birds and the Blue Angels, civilian/military precision flight teams, skydiving teams, and vintage aircraft crews are in the air, Larry has all the frequencies you need to hear them in this new e-book from Teak Publishing.

5-Star Amazon reviews on the last Teak Air Show Guide eBook.

Great information for the 2016 airshow season
Just what I was looking for. Great information for the 2016 airshow season. I bought it in preparation for a local airshow that I was going to stream over the internet. I was able to find most of the frequencies that I wanted and made for a great listening experience for all.

Larry Van Horn does his usual best
Excellent reference guide to get you pointed in all the right directions on any Airshow you attend. Covers all the Demo Teams with the latest frequencies

The best Air Show Guide you can buy
I have been a big fan of Larry Van Horn's work for many years. His publications are always very well written and full of detailed information. I look forward to purchasing next year's guide when it is available.

Five Stars
Perfect resource for the subject

Highly informative guide
I’ve been following Larry Van Horn's writings for a long time. This guy knows his stuff. I can without reservation recommend this book to fellow aviation enthusiasts.

Frequency updates, correction and late additions between editions of this e-Book will be posted on his Milcom Monitoring Post blog at http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/. For a complete list of all the author's books, go to his Amazon authors page at http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00G1QMO4C.
You do not even need to own a Kindle reader to read Amazon e-book publications. You can read any Kindle book with Amazon’s free reading apps. There are free Kindle reading apps for the Kindle Cloud Reader, Smartphones (iPhone, iTouch, Android, Windows Phone and Blackberry); computer platforms (Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8 and Mac); Tablets (iPad, Android and Windows 8), and, of course, all of the Kindle family of readers including the Kindle Fire series. A Kindle e-book allows you to buy your book once and read it anywhere. You can find additional details on these apps by checking out this link to the Amazon website at www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771.
For additional information on this and other Teak Publishing radio hobby books, monitor the company sponsored Internet blogs – The Military Monitoring Post (http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/), The Btown Monitor Post (http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/) and The Shortwave Central (http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/) for the availability of additional e-books that are currently in production.
You can learn more about the author by going to his author page on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00G1QMO4C.

-30-

Tuesday, March 03, 2020

RadioUser Magazine Reviews the Teak Publishing Global Radio Guide



The March 2020 issue of the RadioUser Magazine has reviewed the current edition of the Global Radio Guide (Winter 2019-2020) by David Harris. We here at Teak Publishing sincerely appreciate his review of our flagship publication. You can purchase your copy of the March 0202 RadioUser at https://www.radioenthusiast.co.uk/store/latest-issue/radio-user/. You can get your copy of the Global Radio Guide (Winter 2019-2020) at Amazon https://www.amazon.com/dp/B082DNSN4P/ for US8.99.

Radio User Preview 20

Global Radio Guide (13th ed. Winter 2019 -2020) by Gayle van Horn. Teak Publishing, USA. 2019. 503 pp. eBook format only. £6.86. (available via Amazon)

Global Radio Guide (GRG) may be the new kid on the block when it comes to listener guides as it has only been around since 2014.  Unlike other guides, this is updated twice a year and has now reached its 13th edition. From 2014 -2018 it was known as International Shortwave Broadcast Guide (ISWBG).  GRG does have a noble pedigree in that it originated in 1993 as part of the much-lamented Monitoring Times (MT) magazine which closed in 2013.  After MT closed Gayle decided to continue to serve the SW community through this eBook which now attracts a global audience.

GRG is a veritable encyclopedia of all things SW. It is in two parts: the first part consists of 170 pages of general interest articles about SW radio.  Part two is a 300 page, hour by hour listing of broadcasts. The book begins with a lengthy article on Software-Defined Radios (SDR), how they work and their advantages over conventional radios.  There is a very good overview of SDRs currently on the market from low-cost dongles to the top of the range Winradio Excalibur.  There is also a 13-page review of the Airspy HF+ Discovery.  If you are thinking about moving to SDR listening then the book is worth its very modest price just for this chapter. 

GRG then updates us on US SW superstation WBCQ and its trials and tribulations in getting its 500 kW. transmitter and fully rotatable Ampegon RCA 4.4. antenna up and running.  There are also several general articles on DXing, new products and propagation. 

Unlike WRTH, RLG, and WLG, GRG has coverage of utility stations with 30 pages devoted to listings of aviation, maritime and military SW frequencies. This section explores both voice transmissions and the numerous data modes that may be received. There are also many pages of news about SW broadcasters.

If QSLing is an interest then GRG provides addresses for numerous stations with a track record of sending QSL cards to listeners. There are very comprehensive listings of DX programs and website addresses for SW stations.

Some 300 out of 500 pages of this book are devoted to an hour by hour listing guide for all SW broadcasters around the world (plus many mediumwave stations)  This is an incredible resource which must take half the year to compile.

GRG is more than just another listener guide – it is a very accessible introduction to all aspects of SW listening.  What really stands out is the author’s genuine love of radio. It must take Gayle all of her time to prepare the book and then she has to start all over again in the next edition.  For $8.99 (£6.86) it represents phenomenal value for money. I defy anyone with an interest in SW radio not to find something of interest in this fine publication.



Saturday, February 08, 2020

The 2019 Milcom Files - TSM Edition - Now Available on Amazon


The Teak Publishing Company is pleased to announce the release of its latest eBook in the Milcom Archive series – The Spectrum Monitor Volume 2 (2019) by Larry Van Horn.

Some of the topics covered in this new book during 2019 include:

• Base/Unit Profiles: TAW-5 (NAS Whiting Field FL), 180FW (Toledo OH), 14FTW (Columbus AFB MS), Phantoms in the Desert (Nevada Statewide Milair), and MCAS Cherry Point NC
• Profiles for the Venezuela Military, Pakistan, and Indian Navies
• A North American DoD Aerial Refueling Profile and Frequencies
• Monitoring Government/Military Aircraft in the VHF Aircraft Band
• Monitoring the Air Route Traffic Control Centers: FAA ARTCC Special Use Frequencies, Atlanta ARTCC
• Profiles for the DoD HFHCS HF Radio Network and various USAF HF ALE networks
• Aircraft Spotting in the Digital Age (ADS-B)
• Military Call Sign Lists
• WWV/WWVH Military Broadcasts
• Monitoring the Weather, the Old Fashion Way

The latest Milcom Files - TSM Milcom edition eBook is available now on Amazon at

All his early MT columns have been published in two eBooks. The first two books in the Milcom Files series cover his columns published in Monitoring Times and are available at Amazon.

Book one of The Milcom Files covers the columns published from 1998 to 2006 and sells for US$5.99 at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077NN7RQ5. Book Two in the series covers the period 2007 to 2013 and sells for US$6.99 at https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077NQXH3C.

In 2017 Larry joined the Spectrum Monitor writing staff to continue his efforts to chronicle military communications in a new monthly TSM Milcom column.

His first TSM Milcom Archive eBook, the third book of the Milcom Archive series was published at Amazon in May 2019 and is available at https://www.amazon.com/Milcom-Files-Spectrum-Monitor-2017-2018-ebook/dp/B07RN1ZGLJ/ for US$4.99.

This third eBook in the series incorporates the first two years of his TSM Milcom columns written from September 2017 to the end of 2018. These Milcom columns documented HF military frequencies (both foreign and U.S.), and VHF/UHF spectrum military frequencies, mostly for U.S. based monitors. This third book in the series has over 200 pages of frequencies, call signs, monitoring tips, and how-to style articles.


Given recent international events and natural disasters, most radio listeners quickly learn that when the world is in crisis the military will usually be the first organization called upon to intervene. It pays to monitor military frequencies when international events heat up. Monitoring the military can offer some of the most productive and rewarding listening you will ever experience using your radio. The good news is you do not have to live close to a military installation to hear these communications. But you do need to learn where and when to tune in military communications.

Mention the words "Monitor the Military" and most radio hobbyists will immediately think of military air shows, military aircraft flybys or a whole host of other activities that can be heard via radio frequencies. There is a big radio frequency spectrum out there to monitor but if you know where to listen, and some cases when to listen, you can eavesdrop on some of the most fascinating radio communications you will ever hear on a scanner or shortwave radio.

If you are interested in monitoring military communications, own a scanner, shortwave radio, or have an Internet connection for web software-defined radio (SDR) monitoring, the Milcom Archive Files are a must reference on your radio shack shelf.

Larry Van Horn N5FPW, has been a radio hobbyist for more than 55 years listening to world events and monitoring military radio communications. He has spent over 33 years documenting activity in the military radio spectrum in his monthly Satellite, Utility World, and Milcom (Military Communications) columns in the pages of Monitoring TimesSatellite Times, and The Spectrum Monitor magazines. During this time, he has published a treasure trove of military communication monitoring information.


This book is being released internationally. Amazon customers in the United Kingdom, Germany, France Spain, Italy, Japan, India, Canada, Brazil, Mexico, and Australia can order the eBook from Amazon websites directly servicing these countries. All other countries can use the regular Amazon.com website.

You do not need to own a Kindle reader to read Amazon eBook publications. You can read any Kindle book with Amazon’s free reading apps. There are free Kindle reading apps for the Kindle Cloud Reader, Smartphones (iPhone, iTouch, Android, Windows Phone and Blackberry); computer platforms (Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8 and Mac); Tablets (iPad, Android and Windows 8), and, of course, all the Kindle family of readers including the Kindle Fire series. A Kindle eBook allows you to buy your book once and read it anywhere. You can find additional details on these apps at this link on the Amazon website at www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000493771.

For additional information on this and other Teak Publishing radio hobby books, monitor the company sponsored Internet blogs – The Military Monitoring Post (http://mt-milcom.blogspot.com/), The Btown Monitor Post (http://monitor-post.blogspot.com/) and The Shortwave Central (http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/) for availability of additional eBooks that are currently in production. Information on other publications by the author is available on the author’s page at Amazon http://www.amazon.com/-/e/B00G1QMO4C.


Tuesday, February 04, 2020

Shazam Style Automatic Signal Identification Via The Sigidwiki Database

Fingerprinted Audio Samples of Radio Signals


This is a really interesting development for the digital modes monitors.

Check out https://www.rtl-sdr.com/shazam-style-automatic-signal-identification-via-the-sigidwiki-database/?fbclid=IwAR1okj7C86sJFLzhi7co7Ye-WPBipWaBSXOnlAy4PFUqIiDKslClesn0g1g

Thank you to José Carlos Rueda for submitting news about his work on converting a "Shazam"-like Python program made originally for song identification into a program that can be used to automatically identify radio signals based on their demodulated audio sounds. Shazam is a popular app for smartphones that can pull up the name of any song playing within seconds via the microphone. It works by using audio fingerprinting algorithms and a database of stored song fingerprints.


Using a similar algorithm to Shazam, programmer Joseph Balikuddembe created an open-source program called "audio_recogition_system" [sic] which was designed for creating your own audio fingerprint databases out of any mp3 files.
José then had the clever idea to take the database of signal sounds from sigidwiki.com, and create an identification database of signal sounds for audio recognition_system. He writes that from his database the program can now identify up to 350 known signals from the sigidwiki database. His page contains the installation instructions and a link to download his pre-made database. The software can identify via audio that is input from the PC microphone/virtual audio cable or from a file.


Monday, January 20, 2020

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2020 Jan 20 0748 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 13 - 19 January 2020

Solar activity was very low. The solar disk was spotless. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at moderate levels throughout the reporting period.

Geomagnetic field activity was quiet with an isolated period of unsettled conditions on 16 Jan under a nominal solar wind regime.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 20 January - 15 February 2020

Solar activity is expected to remain at very low levels.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to reach high levels on 21-22 January, due to recurrent CH HSS influence. Moderate levels are anticipated for the remainder of the outlook period.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach active levels on 20-21 Jan with unsettled conditions forecasted on 22 Jan and 01-05 Feb due to recurrent CH HSS activity.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2020 Jan 20 0748 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2020-01-20
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2020 Jan 20      72          12          4
2020 Jan 21      72          12          4
2020 Jan 22      72          10          3
2020 Jan 23      72           5          2
2020 Jan 24      72           5          2
2020 Jan 25      72           5          2
2020 Jan 26      72           5          2
2020 Jan 27      72           5          2
2020 Jan 28      72           5          2
2020 Jan 29      72           5          2
2020 Jan 30      72           5          2
2020 Jan 31      72           5          2
2020 Feb 01      72          10          3
2020 Feb 02      72          10          3
2020 Feb 03      72          10          3
2020 Feb 04      72          10          3
2020 Feb 05      72          10          3
2020 Feb 06      71           5          2
2020 Feb 07      71           5          2
2020 Feb 08      71           5          2
2020 Feb 09      71           5          2
2020 Feb 10      71           5          2
2020 Feb 11      71           5          2
2020 Feb 12      71           5          2
2020 Feb 13      71           5          2
2020 Feb 14      71           5          2
2020 Feb 15      71           5          2
(NOAA)

Monday, January 06, 2020

KTWR Testing DRM


Guam  
KTWR Chief Engineer Steve Brunson announced the KTWR DRM test transmission in
B19 Winter period as follows:

UTC
Wednesday 1026-1056 11995 50kW 315deg for China
Thursday 1226-1241 7500 50kW 320deg for Japan
Sunday 1026-1056 13800 90kW 285deg for India
Reports welcome via online report at http://www.twr.as (akahito Akabayashi BCDX)

Weekly Propagation Forecast Bulletins


Product: Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
:Issued: 2020 Jan 06 0724 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#                Weekly Highlights and Forecasts
#
Highlights of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 30 December - 05 January 2020

Solar activity was very low. New Region 2755 (S34, L=355, class/area Bxo/020 on 03 Jan) developed on the SE limb on 01 Jan but was in decay by 04 Jan. No Earth-directed CMEs were observed.

No proton events were observed at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit was at normal levels on 30 Dec-04 Jan. Moderate levels were reached on 05 Jan with a maximum flux of 245 pfu observed at 05/1800 UTC.

Geomagnetic field activity was at quiet levels on 30 Dec-02 Jan under nominal solar wind conditions. On 03 Jan, total field increased to 10 nT at 03/0505 UTC with solar wind speed increasing to around 410 km/s. On 04 Jan, a prolonged period of southward Bz was observed reaching a maximum southward deflection of -4 nT. On 05 Jan, total field increased once again to 15 nT at 05/1743 UTC followed by an increase in solar wind speed to near 550 km/s as a negative polarity coronal hole high speed stream (CH HSS) became geoeffective. The geomagnetic field responded with isolated unsettled periods on 03-04 Jan and quiet to active levels on 05 Jan.

Forecast of Solar and Geomagnetic Activity 06 January - 01 February 2020

Solar activity is expected to continue at very low levels.

No proton events are expected at geosynchronous orbit.

The greater than 2 MeV electron flux at geosynchronous orbit is expected to be at normal levels on 08-14 Jan and 23 Jan-01 Feb. Moderate levels are expected on 06-07 Jan and again on 15-22 Jan.

Geomagnetic field activity is expected to reach unsettled levels on 08-10 Jan and 01 Feb. Unsettled to active levels are expected on 06 Jan and14-15 Jan due to recurrent CH HSS effects.

Product: 27-day Space Weather Outlook Table 27DO.txt
:Issued: 2020 Jan 06 0724 UTC
# Prepared by the US Dept. of Commerce, NOAA, Space Weather Prediction Center
# Product description and SWPC web contact www.swpc.noaa.gov/content/subscription-services
#
#      27-day Space Weather Outlook Table
#                Issued 2020-01-06
#
#   UTC      Radio Flux   Planetary   Largest
#  Date       10.7 cm      A Index    Kp Index
2020 Jan 06      72          12          4
2020 Jan 07      72           5          2
2020 Jan 08      72           8          3
2020 Jan 09      72           8          3
2020 Jan 10      72           8          3
2020 Jan 11      72           5          2
2020 Jan 12      71           5          2
2020 Jan 13      70           5          2
2020 Jan 14      70          12          4
2020 Jan 15      70          12          4
2020 Jan 16      70           5          2
2020 Jan 17      70           5          2
2020 Jan 18      70           5          2
2020 Jan 19      70           5          2
2020 Jan 20      70           5          2
2020 Jan 21      70           5          2
2020 Jan 22      70           5          2
2020 Jan 23      70           5          2
2020 Jan 24      70           5          2
2020 Jan 25      71           5          2
2020 Jan 26      72           5          2
2020 Jan 27      72           5          2
2020 Jan 28      72           5          2
2020 Jan 29      72           5          2
2020 Jan 30      72           5          2
2020 Jan 31      72           5          2
2020 Feb 01      72           8          3
(NOAA)